Top Voted Content

Bank 2.0

Short description:

by Martina Goehring and Martin Engstler

Herdstreet

Short description:

This site is a investor social network that seems to base its portofolio data from stockalicious. It allows users to share their investments strategy, connect in groups, friends. You can post videos about trading and the markets. It seems to be quite small and recent.

Seedcamp

Short description:

UK, based in London, launched by Saul Klein (Skype, OpenCoffee) and Reshma Sohoni

Home Equity Share

Short description:

US

Why we need equity-based open licenses

Short description:

Quoted from P2P foundation blog

Open licenses leave something important out, nl. equity in the economic process, argues Patrick Godeau.

The excerpt is part of an ongoing discussion which you find here, and Patrick’s own proposal is called the IANG License.

Excerpt:

“The IANG approach is somehow to apply the copyleft principle to economy. That is to say, economic contributions can be given, but not taken away. To guarantee this, all economic contributors should not only have access to accounting, but also have control of it, just like free software contributors can not only access the source code, but also change it. So if a capitalist
company wants to sell ecopyleft works, it must let its customers control its capital.

I think that a big problem with the economy in general is that consumers have no control on it. Multinational companies rule the roost and reign over customers. For example, Stallman was motivated to create the GNU project because a printer manufacturer refused to give the source code of a driver. 25 years later, free drivers may exist for some printers, but the situation has not really improved, free software developers are often obliged to reverse-engineer printer protocols, and customers are forced to buy printers that break down just after the guarantee and can’t be repaired, ink cartridges more expensive than the printer, etc.

Even if the knowledge is copylefted, it is of no help for users as long as means of production are controlled by producers seeking profit. Suppose for example that the patent system is abolished and all pharmaceutical companies are under workers’ control. What would happen? Since we’re in a market economy, these compagnies will probably continue to invest in the most profitable medicine at the expense of billions of people having unprofitable diseases, will continue to spend twice more on advertising than on research, etc.

When working on a license, I think we should always keep in mind the copyleft values of freedom and solidarity. If an economic project is ruled by producers, there won’t be freedom for users to determine its orientation, their only option being to choose a competitor project on the market. The solidarity between producers and consumers is a central value of copyleft, and a raison d’être of IANG is to defend this solidarity also on the economic level. This kind of partnership between consumers and producers is also emerging nowadays for example through fair trade, the Seikatsu cooperatives, etc. But I think that creative works are special because the public is more inclined to donate to artists. Involvement of the public even starts to happen in movie production, as for example with korean netizen funds or Blender open movies. If a 100% open economy will be harder to reach than 100% open
source (even open source software sometimes uses closed source drivers) and some intermediaries may be necessary, I think it’s important that users have a control, in conjunction with producers, so that they can counteract these intermediaries, and make progress towards a more free society.

Reverse Bounty

Short description:

A "reverse bounty" is a concept I was discussing at the 2005 Drupal conference. Bounties are a fairly well known concept within the open source world: users post bounties in order that bugs get fixed or features get added.

The main issue with this is that it is user driven, and end users often don't have any concept of how easy or hard something is to implement -- or even what might be possible given the platform.

Reverse bounties are instead posted by developers. It is an idea and feature description of something that the developer actually wants to work on, along with the money required. The developer knows that it can be done, knows what the platform can do, and has the skills to actually implement it. The money allows them to dedicate time to actually work on it.

Meta-Markets

Short description:

quoted from website

"Meta-Markets has many markets each composed of different values generated in various domains. Markets are open to all members for trading and for offering their own products to public (IPO). In the sale (allocation and pricing) of shares in an IPO, the value of a share comes from its domain. For example, if you issue your Delicious bookmark, your Delicious bookmark's counts is the value. If you issue your Facebook profile, the number of Facebook friends is the value. When you sign up, you get an initial amount money to start your investments. The currency is "buraks", which is the foundation currency of the MIT's Openstudio online creative economy. Meta-Markets is a peer-to-peer market, so you always buy from a person and sell directly to a person. Of course to make profit you buy low and sell high. You set up the price of your stocks and wait for others to buy. If you put the price low people most likely buy it, if you set it high you sell when its worth that much. Watch the changes in the last price, and change your prices accordingly. To IPO your own creative products, you must be the owner of that product in its domain. When you IPO your product, the majority of your product still belongs to you, you open less than 50% shares to public. After the IPO, people buy your shares, and you raise capital.

Herdstreet

Short description:

This site is a investor social network that seems to base its portofolio data from stockalicious. It allows users to share their investments strategy, connect in groups, friends. You can post videos about trading and the markets. It seems to be quite small and recent.

Seedcamp

Short description:

UK, based in London, launched by Saul Klein (Skype, OpenCoffee) and Reshma Sohoni

Home Equity Share

Short description:

US

Why we need equity-based open licenses

Short description:

Quoted from P2P foundation blog

Open licenses leave something important out, nl. equity in the economic process, argues Patrick Godeau.

The excerpt is part of an ongoing discussion which you find here, and Patrick’s own proposal is called the IANG License.

Excerpt:

“The IANG approach is somehow to apply the copyleft principle to economy. That is to say, economic contributions can be given, but not taken away. To guarantee this, all economic contributors should not only have access to accounting, but also have control of it, just like free software contributors can not only access the source code, but also change it. So if a capitalist
company wants to sell ecopyleft works, it must let its customers control its capital.

I think that a big problem with the economy in general is that consumers have no control on it. Multinational companies rule the roost and reign over customers. For example, Stallman was motivated to create the GNU project because a printer manufacturer refused to give the source code of a driver. 25 years later, free drivers may exist for some printers, but the situation has not really improved, free software developers are often obliged to reverse-engineer printer protocols, and customers are forced to buy printers that break down just after the guarantee and can’t be repaired, ink cartridges more expensive than the printer, etc.

Even if the knowledge is copylefted, it is of no help for users as long as means of production are controlled by producers seeking profit. Suppose for example that the patent system is abolished and all pharmaceutical companies are under workers’ control. What would happen? Since we’re in a market economy, these compagnies will probably continue to invest in the most profitable medicine at the expense of billions of people having unprofitable diseases, will continue to spend twice more on advertising than on research, etc.

When working on a license, I think we should always keep in mind the copyleft values of freedom and solidarity. If an economic project is ruled by producers, there won’t be freedom for users to determine its orientation, their only option being to choose a competitor project on the market. The solidarity between producers and consumers is a central value of copyleft, and a raison d’être of IANG is to defend this solidarity also on the economic level. This kind of partnership between consumers and producers is also emerging nowadays for example through fair trade, the Seikatsu cooperatives, etc. But I think that creative works are special because the public is more inclined to donate to artists. Involvement of the public even starts to happen in movie production, as for example with korean netizen funds or Blender open movies. If a 100% open economy will be harder to reach than 100% open
source (even open source software sometimes uses closed source drivers) and some intermediaries may be necessary, I think it’s important that users have a control, in conjunction with producers, so that they can counteract these intermediaries, and make progress towards a more free society.

Reverse Bounty

Short description:

A "reverse bounty" is a concept I was discussing at the 2005 Drupal conference. Bounties are a fairly well known concept within the open source world: users post bounties in order that bugs get fixed or features get added.

The main issue with this is that it is user driven, and end users often don't have any concept of how easy or hard something is to implement -- or even what might be possible given the platform.

Reverse bounties are instead posted by developers. It is an idea and feature description of something that the developer actually wants to work on, along with the money required. The developer knows that it can be done, knows what the platform can do, and has the skills to actually implement it. The money allows them to dedicate time to actually work on it.

Tiger21

Short description:

Excerpt from site

 

TIGER 21 is the nation’s premier peer-to-peer learning group for high-net-worth investors. We help members build the skill set to successfully transition from focused entrepreneurs to disciplined managers of wealth. Participating in professionally-facilitated, 10-12 person groups, our members meet monthly to harness the varied expertise and collective intelligence of their peers in high-energy, day-long sessions.
 

BillMonk

Thomas Purves

Meta-Markets

Short description:

quoted from website

"Meta-Markets has many markets each composed of different values generated in various domains. Markets are open to all members for trading and for offering their own products to public (IPO). In the sale (allocation and pricing) of shares in an IPO, the value of a share comes from its domain. For example, if you issue your Delicious bookmark, your Delicious bookmark's counts is the value. If you issue your Facebook profile, the number of Facebook friends is the value. When you sign up, you get an initial amount money to start your investments. The currency is "buraks", which is the foundation currency of the MIT's Openstudio online creative economy. Meta-Markets is a peer-to-peer market, so you always buy from a person and sell directly to a person. Of course to make profit you buy low and sell high. You set up the price of your stocks and wait for others to buy. If you put the price low people most likely buy it, if you set it high you sell when its worth that much. Watch the changes in the last price, and change your prices accordingly. To IPO your own creative products, you must be the owner of that product in its domain. When you IPO your product, the majority of your product still belongs to you, you open less than 50% shares to public. After the IPO, people buy your shares, and you raise capital.